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Holistic Therapies – Reflexology – Aromatherapy - Swedish Body Massage – Indian Head Massage – Waxing – Hot Stone Therapy – Ear Candling – Counselling
Holistic Therapies – Reflexology – Aromatherapy - Swedish Body Massage – Indian Head Massage – Waxing – Hot Stone Therapy – Ear Candling – Counselling

Aromatherapy

AROMATHERAPY
50-6_2-how-can-i-improve

Appointments

07866 500379

What is aromatherapy good for?

Aromatherapy is used in a wide range of settings -- from health spas to hospitals -- to treat a variety of conditions. In general, it seems to relieve pain, improve mood, and promote a sense of relaxation.
Several clinical studies suggest that when essential oils (particularly rose, lavender, and frankincense) were used by qualified midwives, pregnant women felt less anxiety and fear, had a stronger sense of well-being, and had less need for pain medications during delivery. Many women also report that peppermint oil relieves nausea and vomiting during labour.
Massage therapy with essential oils (combined with medications or therapy) may benefit people with depression. The scents are thought by some to stimulate positive emotions in the area of the brain responsible for memories and emotions, but the benefits seem to be related to relaxation caused by the scents and the massage. A person' s belief that the treatment will help also influences whether it works.
In test tubes, chemical compounds from some essential oils have shown antibacterial and anti-fungal properties. Some evidence also suggests that citrus oils may strengthen the immune system and that peppermint oil may help with digestion. Fennel, aniseed, sage, and clary-sage have estrogen-like compounds, which may help relieve symptoms of premenstrual syndrome and menopause. However, human studies are lacking.
Other conditions for which aromatherapy may be helpful include:

• Alopecia areata (hair loss)
• Agitation, possibly including agitation related to dementia
• Anxiety
• Constipation (with abdominal massage using aromatherapy)
• Insomnia
• Pain: Studies have found that people with rheumatoid arthritis, cancer (using topical chamomile), and headaches (using topical peppermint) require fewer pain medications when they use aromatherapy
• Itching, a common side effect for those receiving dialysis
• Psoriasis

History

Aromatherapy may have origins in antiquity with the use of infused aromatic oils, made by macerating dried plant material in fatty oil, heating and then filtering. Many such oils are described by Dioscorides, along with beliefs of the time regarding their healing properties, in his De Materia Medica, written in the first century. Distilled essential oils have been employed as medicines since the invention of distillation in the eleventh century, when Avicenna isolated essential oils using steam distillation.

The concept of aromatherapy was first mooted by a small number of European scientists and doctors, in about[weasel words] 1907. In 1937, the word first appeared in print in a French book on the subject: Aromatherapies: Les Huiles Essential’s, Hormones Vegetables by René-Maurice Gattefossé, a chemist. An English version was published in 1993, In 1910, Gattefossé burned a hand very badly in a laboratory explosion. The hand developed gas gangrene, which he successfully, and intentionally, treated with lavender oil.

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